Death poems

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Shut Not Your Doors, andc

© Walt Whitman

SHUT not your doors to me, proud libraries,

For that which was lacking on all your well-fill’d shelves, yet needed most, I bring;

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To a Gentleman and Lady on the Death of the Lady's Brother and Sister

© Phillis Wheatley

But, Madam, let your grief be laid aside,
And let the fountain of your tears be dry'd,
In vain they flow to wet the dusty plain,
Your sighs are wafted to the skies in vain,
Your pains they witness, but they can no more,
While Death reigns tyrant o'er this mortal shore.

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Verses on Sir Joshua Reynold's Painted Window at New College, Oxford

© Thomas Warton

Reynolds, 'tis thine, from the broad window's height,
To add new lustre to religious light:
Not of its pomp to strip this ancient shrine,
But bid that pomp with purer radiance shine:
With arts unknown before, to reconcile
The willing Graces to the Gothic pile.

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The Emigrants: Book II

© Charlotte Turner Smith

Scene, on an Eminence on one of those Downs, which afford to the South a view of the Sea; to the North of the Weald of Sussex. Time, an Afternoon in April, 1793.


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The Emigrants: Book I

© Charlotte Turner Smith

Scene, on the Cliffs to the Eastward of the Town of

Brighthelmstone in Sussex. Time, a Morning in November, 1792.

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A Refusal To Mourn The Death, By Fire, Of A Child In London

© Dylan Thomas

Never until the mankind making
Bird beast and flower
Fathering and all humbling darkness
Tells with silence the last light breaking
And the still hour
Is come of the sea tumbling in harness

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Song of the Lotos-Eaters

© Alfred Tennyson

THERE is sweet music here that softer falls


Than petals from blown roses on the grass,

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Memoriam A. H. H.: 44. How fares it with the happy dead?

© Alfred Tennyson

If such a dreamy touch should fall,
O turn thee round, resolve the doubt;
My guardian angel will speak out
In that high place, and tell thee all.

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In Memoriam A. HIn Memoriam A. H. H.: 56. So careful of the type? but no.: 55. The wish, that of the living whol

© Alfred Tennyson

Who trusted God was love indeed
And love Creation's final law--
Tho' Nature, red in tooth and claw
With ravine, shriek'd against his creed--

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In Memoriam A. H. H.: The Prelude

© Alfred Tennyson

Thou seemest human and divine,
The highest, holiest manhood, thou.
Our wills are ours, we know not how,
Our wills are ours, to make them thine.

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In Memoriam A. H. H.: 99. Risest thou thus, dim dawn, again

© Alfred Tennyson

Who wakenest with thy balmy breath
To myriads on the genial earth,
Memories of bridal, or of birth,
And unto myriads more, of death.

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In Memoriam A. H. H.: 95. By night we linger'd on the lawn

© Alfred Tennyson

While now we sang old songs that peal'd
From knoll to knoll, where, couch'd at ease,
The white kine glimmer'd, and the trees
Laid their dark arms about the field.

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In Memoriam A. H. H.: 82. I wage not any feud with death

© Alfred Tennyson

For this alone on Death I wreak
The wrath that garners in my heart;
He put our lives so far apart
We cannot hear each other speak.

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In Memoriam A. H. H.: 45. The baby new to earth and sky

© Alfred Tennyson

This use may lie in blood and breath
Which else were fruitless of their due,
Had man to learn himself anew
Beyond the second birth of Death.

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In Memoriam A. H. H. Obiit MDCCCXXXIII: 3. O Sorrow, cruel

© Alfred Tennyson

And shall I take a thing so blind,
Embrace her as my natural good;
Or crush her, like a vice of blood,
Upon the threshold of the mind?

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Charge of the Light Brigade

© Alfred Tennyson

When can their glory fade?
O the wild charge they made!
All the world wonder'd.
Honour the charge they made!
Honour the Light Brigade,
Noble six hundred!

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Alfred Lord Tennyson - The Coming Of Arthur

© Alfred Tennyson

Leodogran, the King of Cameliard,
Had one fair daughter, and none other child;
And she was the fairest of all flesh on earth,
Guinevere, and in her his one delight.

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The List of Famous Hats

© James Tate

Napoleon's hat is an obvious choice I guess to list as a famous

hat, but that's not the hat I have in mind. That was his hat for

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More Later, Less The Same

© James Tate

The common is unusually calm--they captured the storm

last night, it's sleeping in the stockade, relieved

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Amoretti LXXV: One Day I Wrote Her Name

© Edmund Spenser

One day I wrote her name upon the strand,

But came the waves and washed it away: