Nature poems

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Chicago Zen

© A. K. Ramanujan



Now tidy your house,
dust especially your living room

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Shut Not Your Doors, andc

© Walt Whitman

SHUT not your doors to me, proud libraries,

For that which was lacking on all your well-fill’d shelves, yet needed most, I bring;

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To a Gentleman and Lady on the Death of the Lady's Brother and Sister

© Phillis Wheatley

But, Madam, let your grief be laid aside,
And let the fountain of your tears be dry'd,
In vain they flow to wet the dusty plain,
Your sighs are wafted to the skies in vain,
Your pains they witness, but they can no more,
While Death reigns tyrant o'er this mortal shore.

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Verses on Sir Joshua Reynold's Painted Window at New College, Oxford

© Thomas Warton

Reynolds, 'tis thine, from the broad window's height,
To add new lustre to religious light:
Not of its pomp to strip this ancient shrine,
But bid that pomp with purer radiance shine:
With arts unknown before, to reconcile
The willing Graces to the Gothic pile.

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The Emigrants: Book II

© Charlotte Turner Smith

Scene, on an Eminence on one of those Downs, which afford to the South a view of the Sea; to the North of the Weald of Sussex. Time, an Afternoon in April, 1793.


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The Emigrants: Book I

© Charlotte Turner Smith

Scene, on the Cliffs to the Eastward of the Town of

Brighthelmstone in Sussex. Time, a Morning in November, 1792.

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Sonnet LXVI: The Night-Flood Rakes

© Charlotte Turner Smith

The night-flood rakes upon the stony shore;

Along the rugged cliffs and chalky caves

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To Virgil, Written at the Request of the Mantuans for the N

© Alfred Tennyson

Poet of the happy Tityrus
piping underneath his beechen bowers;
Poet of the poet-satyr
whom the laughing shepherd bound with flowers;

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Memoriam A. H. H.: 72. Risest thou thus, dim dawn, again

© Alfred Tennyson

Who might'st have heaved a windless flame
Up the deep East, or, whispering, play'd
A chequer-work of beam and shade
Along the hills, yet look'd the same.

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In Memoriam A. HIn Memoriam A. H. H.: 56. So careful of the type? but no.: 55. The wish, that of the living whol

© Alfred Tennyson

Who trusted God was love indeed
And love Creation's final law--
Tho' Nature, red in tooth and claw
With ravine, shriek'd against his creed--

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In Memoriam A. H. H.: 83. Dip down upon the northern shore

© Alfred Tennyson

O thou new-year, delaying long,
Delayest the sorrow in my blood,
That longs to burst a frozen bud
And flood a fresher throat with song.

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In Memoriam A. H. H.: 55. The wish, that of the living whol

© Alfred Tennyson

I falter where I firmly trod,
And falling with my weight of cares
Upon the great world's altar-stairs
That slope thro' darkness up to God,

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In Memoriam A. H. H.: 54. Oh, yet we Trust that somehow Goo

© Alfred Tennyson

Behold, we know not anything;
I can but trust that good shall fall
At last--far off--at last, to all,
And every winter change to spring.

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In Memoriam A. H. H.: 5. Sometimes I Hold it half a Sin

© Alfred Tennyson

I sometimes hold it half a sin

To put in words the grief I feel;

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In Memoriam A. H. H.: 131. O living will that shalt endure

© Alfred Tennyson

O true and tried, so well and long,
Demand not thou a marriage lay;
In that it is thy marriage day
Is music more than any song.

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In Memoriam A. H. H.: 118. Contemplate all this work of Tim

© Alfred Tennyson

Who throve and branch'd from clime to clime,
The herald of a higher race,
And of himself in higher place,
If so he type this work of time

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In Memoriam A. H. H. Obiit MDCCCXXXIII: 3. O Sorrow, cruel

© Alfred Tennyson

And shall I take a thing so blind,
Embrace her as my natural good;
Or crush her, like a vice of blood,
Upon the threshold of the mind?

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Dream On

© James Tate

Some people go their whole lives

without ever writing a single poem.

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The Comedian As The Letter C

© Wallace Stevens

379 Trinket pasticcio, flaunting skyey sheets,
380 With Crispin as the tiptoe cozener?
381 No, no: veracious page on page, exact.

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A Hymn Of Heavenly Beauty

© Edmund Spenser

Rapt with the rage of mine own ravish'd thought,

Through contemplation of those goodly sights,