Pet poems

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An Open Letter to the Unacknowledged One

© Aaron Rafi

There was no prayer in the camps

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"The Undying One" - Canto III

© Caroline Norton

"I went through the world, but I paused not now
At the gladsome heart and the joyous brow:
I went through the world, and I stay'd to mark
Where the heart was sore, and the spirit dark:
And the grief of others, though sad to see,
Was fraught with a demon's joy to me!

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Epipsychidion

© Percy Bysshe Shelley

Sweet Spirit! Sister of that orphan one,
Whose empire is the name thou weepest on,
In my heart's temple I suspend to thee
These votive wreaths of withered memory.

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Eighteen Hundred and Sixty-Four

© Henry Kendall

I HEAR no footfall beating through the dark,
  A lonely gust is loitering at the pane;
There is no sound within these forests stark
  Beyond a splash or two of sullen rain;

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Written In Australia

© Arthur Henry Adams

THE WIDE sun stares without a cloud:  


 Whipped by his glances truculent  

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Vaudracour And Julia

© William Wordsworth

O HAPPY time of youthful lovers (thus
My story may begin) O balmy time,
In which a love-knot on a lady's brow
Is fairer than the fairest star in heaven!

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Her Portrait

© Francis Thompson

Oh, but the heavenly grammar did I hold

Of that high speech which angels' tongues turn gold!

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Petrov and Kamarov

© Daniil Ivanovich Kharms

Petrov: Hey, Kamarov, old chap!
Let's catch a few of these gnats!
Kamarov: No, I'm not yet up to that;
We'd do better to catch some tom-cats!

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The Pastime of Pleasure: Of dysposycyon the II. parte of rethoryke - (til line 1456)

© Stephen Hawes

The seconde parte of crafty rethoryke
Maye well be called dysposycyon
822 That doth so hyghe mater aromatytyke
823 Adowne dystyll / by consolacyon

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I pay—in Satin Cash

© Emily Dickinson

I pay—in Satin Cash—
You did not state—your price—
A Petal, for a Paragraph
It near as I can guess—

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An Epistle To William Hogarth

© Charles Churchill

Amongst the sons of men how few are known

Who dare be just to merit not their own!

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Sonnet IX. Keen, Fitful Gusts Are

© John Keats

Keen, fitful gusts are whisp'ring here and there
Among the bushes half leafless, and dry;
The stars look very cold about the sky,
And I have many miles on foot to fare.

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Dans Un Omnibus De Londres

© Ezra Pound

Les yeux d'une morte

M'ont salué,

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Pharsalia - Book V: The Oracle. The Mutiny. The Storm

© Marcus Annaeus Lucanus

  While soldier thus and chief,
In doubtful sort, against their hidden fate
Devised their counsel, Appius alone
Feared for the chances of the war, and sought
Through Phoebus' ancient oracle to break
The silence of the gods and know the end.

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Suppose

© Paul Laurence Dunbar

IF 'twere fair to suppose

That your heart were not taken,

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Aphrodisiac

© Sheldon Allan Silverstein

Now, listen to me, folks...
Hear what I say.
You got to eat oysters everyday
They'll put your love life back on track
They're nature's own aphrodisiac.

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On the Death of Dr. Robert Levet

© Samuel Johnson

Condemn'd to Hope's delusive mine,
As on we toil from day to day,
By sudden blasts or slow decline,
Our social comforts drop away.

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Morning Peace.

© Arthur Henry Adams

THE sudden sunbeams slant between the trees
Like solid bars of silver. moonlight kissed,
And strike the supine shadows where they rest
Stretched sleeping; while a timid, new-born Breeze

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A Lover's Quarrel Among the Fairies

© William Butler Yeats

Male Fairies: Do not fear us, earthly maid!
We will lead you hand in hand
By the willows in the glade,
By the gorse on the high land,

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Rhymed Plea For Tolerance - Dialogue II.

© John Kenyon


A.—
  By no faint shame withheld from general gaze,
  'Tis thus, my friend, we bask us in the blaze;
  Where deeds, more surface-smooth than inly bright,
  Snatch up a transient lustre from the light.