Strength poems

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The Emigrants: Book II

© Charlotte Turner Smith

Scene, on an Eminence on one of those Downs, which afford to the South a view of the Sea; to the North of the Weald of Sussex. Time, an Afternoon in April, 1793.


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Alfred Lord Tennyson - The Coming Of Arthur

© Alfred Tennyson

Leodogran, the King of Cameliard,
Had one fair daughter, and none other child;
And she was the fairest of all flesh on earth,
Guinevere, and in her his one delight.

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The Comedian As The Letter C

© Wallace Stevens

379 Trinket pasticcio, flaunting skyey sheets,
380 With Crispin as the tiptoe cozener?
381 No, no: veracious page on page, exact.

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Astrophel and Stella: XLI

© Sir Philip Sidney

Having this day my horse, my hand, my lance

Guided so well that I obtain'd the prize,

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Astrophel and Stella VII: WhenNature Made her Chief Work

© Sir Philip Sidney

When Nature made her chief work, Stella's eyes,

In colour black why wrapt she beams so bright?

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Astrophel and Stella

© Sir Philip Sidney


Doubt you to whom my Muse these notes entendeth,
Which now my breast, surcharg'd, to musick lendeth!
To you, to you, all song of praise is due,
Only in you my song begins and endeth.

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Duino Elegies

© Rainer Maria Rilke

The First Elegy


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Paula Becker to Clara Westhoff

© Adrienne Rich

The autumn feels slowed down,

summer still holds on here, even the light

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Rubaiyat

© Tanwir Phool

Jo lamHa guzartaa hai who keya detaa hai?
Dauraaniya-e-zeest bataa detaa hai
Aie Phool ! ghaTaa umr se ik aur baras
Jaataa huwaa har saal sadaa detaa hai

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America

© Claude McKay

Although she feeds me bread of bitterness,

And sinks into my throat her tiger's tooth,

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Davis Matlock

© Edgar Lee Masters

Suppose it is nothing but the hive:

That there are drones and workers

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Crow Sickene

© Ted Hughes

Decided to get death, but whatever
Walked into his ambush
Was always his own body.

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That Time and Absence proves Rather helps than hurts to loves

© John Donne

ABSENCE hear thou my protestation
Against thy strength
Distance and length:
Do what thou canst for alteration
For hearts of truest mettle 5
Absence doth join and Time doth settle.

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Dickinson Poems by Number

© Emily Dickinson

One Sister have I in our house,
And one, a hedge away.
There's only one recorded,
But both belong to me.

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363. Song-My Native Land sae far awa

© Robert Burns

O SAD and heavy, should I part,
But for her sake, sae far awa;
Unknowing what my way may thwart,
My native land sae far awa.

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Yarrow Visited. September, 1814

© William Wordsworth

And is this--Yarrow?--This the streamOf which my fancy cherished,So faithfully, a waking dream?An image that hath perished!O that some Minstrel's harp were near,To utter notes of gladness,And chase this silence from the air,That fills my heart with sadness!

Yet why?--a silvery current flowsWith uncontrolled meanderings;Nor have these eyes by greener hillsBeen soothed, in all my wanderings

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Song at the Feast of Brougham Castle upon the Restoration of Lord Clifford, the Shepherd, to the Estates and Honours of his Ancestors

© William Wordsworth

High in the breathless Hall the Minstrel sate,And Emont's murmur mingled with the Song.--The words of ancient time I thus translate,A festal strain that hath been silent long:--

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The Prelude: Book 2: School-time (Continued)

© William Wordsworth

Thus far, O Friend! have we, though leaving muchUnvisited, endeavour'd to retraceMy life through its first years, and measured backThe way I travell'd when I first beganTo love the woods and fields; the passion yetWas in its birth, sustain'd, as might befal,By nourishment that came unsought, for still,From week to week, from month to month, we liv'dA round of tumult: duly were our gamesProlong'd in summer till the day-light fail'd;No chair remain'd before the doors, the benchAnd threshold steps were empty; fast asleepThe Labourer, and the old Man who had sate,A later lingerer, yet the revelryContinued, and the loud uproar: at last,When all the ground was dark, and the huge cloudsWere edged with twinkling stars, to bed we went,With weary joints, and with a beating mind

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Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood

© William Wordsworth

The child is father of the man;And I could wish my days to be Bound each to each by natural piety. (Wordsworth, "My Heart Leaps Up")

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Influence of Natural Objects in Calling Forth and Strengthening the Imagination in Boyhood and Early Youth

© William Wordsworth

Wisdom and Spirit of the universe!Thou Soul, that art the Eternity of thought!And giv'st to forms and images a breathAnd everlasting motion! not in vain,By day or star-light, thus from my first dawnOf childhood didst thou intertwine for meThe passions that build up our human soul;Not with the mean and vulgar works of Man;But with high objects, with enduring things,With life and nature; purifying thusThe elements of feeling and of thought,And sanctifying by such disciplineBoth pain and fear,--until we recogniseA grandeur in the beatings of the heart